China’s View on the SCO Development And the Belt and Road Initiative

Azhar E Serikkaliyeva

Abstract


Chinese President Xi Jinping is seeking a greater role for the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) and has made a four-point proposal for the development of the organization. Firstly, safeguarding regional security and stability is an SCO member states’ responsibility. The president was most interested in focusing on anti-extremism and internet terrorism. He also called on the organization to give the Regional Anti-Terrorism Structure (RATS) new functions to combat drug trafficking.

Secondly, the goal of common development and prosperity including greater cooperation in trade and investment through creating the Free Trade Zone.

Thirdly, to encourage more people-to-people exchanges through labor forces migration.

Finally, expand external exchanges and cooperation. By this to encourage more cooperation between newly joined member-states (India and Pakistan) and observer states.  

Any expansion of trade and investment along with one or more SCO members and observer nations would fall neatly into the Chinese drive to create a New Silk Road Economic Belt and Maritime Silk Road, collectively called as the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Chinese BRI apparently takes great attention to the Central Asian region in terms of economic prospects it opens to multiple foreign stakeholders. However, some scientists consider that this initiative is more likely to be China’s attempts to strengthen its geopolitical power and positive image and personally of Xi Jinping. Such an influx of soft and hard powers nurtures China’s global presence and directs overall cooperation in a peaceful way.

The paper will measure their capacities, risks and contributions of the SCO to the BRI initiative development. Thus, it will deepen the Central Asia and China regional cooperation studies. Through the identifying of the main mechanisms of the SCO and its policy, the paper will analyze how it’s practiced in Kazakhstan specifically. 


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